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COVID-19 Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions

All answers courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

To stay up to date with the latest information from the CDC, visit  www.cdc.gov/coronavirus .

Murfreesboro Medical Clinic is working tirelessly to stay current with updates from the CDC regarding COVID-19 (novel Coronavirus). This site is being continually updated to reflect recent recommendations.
Last updated: 1/22/2021


What should I expect after getting a COVID-19 vaccine?

COVID-19 vaccination will help protect you from gettingCOVID-19. You may have some side effects, which are normal signs that your body is building protection. These side effects may affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days. If you have pain or discomfort, talk to your doctor about taking an over-the-counter medicine, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen. Common side effects include pain and swelling in the arm where you receive the shot.

How much will the shot hurt? Can it cause you to get very sick?

Most people do not have serious problems after being vaccinated. However, your arm may be sore, red, or warm to the touch. These symptoms usually go away on their own within a week. Some people report getting a headache or fever when getting a vaccine. These side effects are a sign that your immune system is doing exactly what it is supposed to do. It is working and building up protection to disease.

How do we know that these vaccines are safe when they are so new? Couldn’t they cause problems that we don’t know about yet? What about long-term problems?

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) carefully reviews all safety data from clinical trials and authorizes emergency vaccine use only when the expected benefits outweigh potential risks.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)reviews all safety data before recommending any COVID-19 vaccine for use. Learn how ACIP makes vaccine recommendations.

FDA and CDC will continue to monitor the safety of COVID-19vaccines, to make sure even very rare side effects are identified.

Why do we need 2shots?

Two shots are needed to provide the best protection againstCOVID-19 and that the shots are given several weeks apart. The first shot primes the immune system, helping it recognize the virus, and the second shot strengthens the immune response.

Will mRNA vaccines affect my DNA?

No, they do not affect or interact with our DNA in any way. mRNA never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA (genetic material) is kept. The cell breaks down and gets rid of the mRNA soon after it is finished using the instructions.

Is the COVID-19vaccine recommended for pregnant and breastfeeding women?

American College of Gynecology recommends that COVID-19vaccines should not be withheld from pregnant individuals who meet criteria for vaccination based on ACIP-recommended priority groups.


Who should not get the COVID-19 vaccine?

Adults of any age with certain underlying medical conditions are at increased risk for severe illness from the virus that causes COVID-19.mRNA COVID-19 vaccines may be administered to people with underlying medical conditions provided they have not had a severe or immediate allergic reaction to any of the ingredients in the vaccine.

Reach out to your primary care physician to discuss if receiving the COVID-19 vaccine is recommended for your individual circumstance.  


What is recommended for those concerned about allergic reactions?

If you have had an immediate allergic reaction—even if it was not severe—to any ingredient in an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, CDC recommends that you should not get either of the currently available mRNA COVID-19 vaccines.

If you had an immediate allergic reaction after getting the first dose of an mRNA COVID-19vaccine, you should not get the second dose.

CDC recommends that people with a history of severe allergic reactions not related to vaccines or injectable medications—such as food, pet, venom, environmental, or latex allergies—get vaccinated. People with a history of allergies to oral medications or a family history of severe allergic reactions may also get vaccinated.

Reach out to your primary care physician and/or your allergy specialist to provide more care or advice.

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